The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson
ĽOvert Obstruction of Congress

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Domestic Intelligence
Harper's Weekly, September 7, 1867, page 563

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Southern Reconstruction
General Grant, in protesting against the removal of General Sheridan, said to the President: "It is unmistakably the expressed wish of the country that General Sheridan should not be removed from his present command…General Sheridan has performed his civil duties faithfully and intelligently. His removal will only be regarded as an effort to defeat the laws of Congress…There are military reasons, pecuniary reasons, and, above all, patriotic reasons why this order should not be insisted on." These reasons Mr. Johnson failed to perceive, and the order was issued. In giving the necessary instructions which accompanied the order General Thomas was directed by General Grant to execute all orders he might find in force in Sheridan’s district, unless authorized by the General of the army to annul, alter, or modify them. Owing to the illness of General Thomas the order was subsequently suspended; and finally, on August 26, General Hancock was ordered to New Orleans to relieve Sheridan, and was explicitly authorized to change, alter, and modify any of the existing regulations of General Sheridan.

General Daniel E. Sickles was removed from the command of the Second Military District on August 26, and General Edward R. S. Canby assigned to duty in his place.

Registration was completed in Alabama on August 26; the returns show 67,686 whites, 84,524 blacks; total, 152,210; black majority 16, 838.

Articles Related to Overt Obstruction of Congress:
Congress
February 2, 1867, page 67
February 16, 1867, page 99
March 16, 1867, page 163


How Long?
June 29, 1867, page 402


Reconstruction and Obstruction
July 6, 1867, page 418


The Summer Session
July 6, 1867, page 418


The Fortieth Congress
July 17, 1867, page 467


Thanks to the District Commanders
July 27, 1867, page 467


Impeachment Postponed
July 27, 1867, page 467


A Desperate Man
August 13, 1867, page 546


The Secretary of War
August 24, 1867, page 530


Samson Agonistes at Washington (cartoon)
August 24, 1867, page 544


The Stanton Imbroglio (illustrated satire)
August 24, 1867, page 542


Secretary Grant
August 31, 1867, page 546


Southern Reconstruction
August 31, 1867, page 547


The Political Situation
September 7, 1867, page 562


General Thomas
September 7, 1867, page 563


Southern Reconstruction
September 7, 1867, page 563


The General and the President
September 14, 1867, page 578


General Sickles Also
September 14, 1867, page 579


Southern Reconstruction
September 21, 1867, page 595


The President’s Intentions
September 28, 1867, page 610


Impeachment
October 5, 1867, page 626


The Main Question
October 5, 1867, pages 626-627


Suspension during Impeachment
October 19, 1867, page 658


"Disregarding" The Law
November 2, 1867, page 691


Impeachment
December 14, 1867, page 786


General Grant’s Testimony
December 14, 1867, page 786


The President’s Message
December 14, 1867, page 787


General Grant’s Letter
January 1, 1868, page 2


Secretary Stanton’s Restoration
January 25, 1868, page 51


Reconstruction Measures
January 25, 1868, page 51


The President, Mr. Stanton and General Grant
February 1, 1868, page 66


Romeo (Seward) to Mercutio (Johnson) (cartoon)
February 1, 1868, page 76


The War Office
February 1, 1868, page 77


Secretary’s Room in the War Department (illus)
February 1, 1868, page 77


The New Reconstruction Bill
February 8, 1868, page 83

 

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